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Accept
Eat The Heat
Type: CD
Company: Epic Records
Release: 1989
Genre: Traditional
Reviewer: Eric Compton
Published: 12/5/2005
Slightly different record to pull out off the shelves from time to time
It is really rare to have someone just come out of nowhere and take the reigns of a band that has had a long and successful career, both commercially and within the metal community. Sure we've seen it before, most recently with Tim Owens fronting Judas Priest and Gary Cherone shipwrecking Van Halen. The chances of success are probably fifty-fifty when you think about it. Guys like Andi Deris (Helloween), Ronnie James Dio (Black Sabbath), and even Mike Howe (Metal Church) have had tremendous results when leading a band with a good sized following. Then of course you have the guys that just flunk out completely, like Owens or Cherone.

David Reece is one of those guys, a complete failure anyway you look at it. But the guy had IT, yeah IT. That thing that singers need to front the unit, to lead the charge in one way or another. He had a great voice, a fantastic look, and a desire to rock with the best of them. The problem? He just couldn't fill the void left by a tiny powerhouse; Udo Dirkschneider.

In 1980, German hard rockers Accept landed in the big time with their second record, "I'm A Rebel". The album ignited a Teutonic charge that incorporated the best of the German rock sound (Scorpions) and combined it with a classic, more traditional metal brigade (perhaps in the vein of Saxon?). That battle soaked, hard rock approach led to classics like "Restless & Wild", "Balls To The Wall", "Metal Heart", and "Russian Roulette". However by 1989 Udo had two fairly successful solo ventures in "Animal House" and "Mean Machine", which in all honesty still kept a majority of the Accept sound that made him famous to begin with. With some tension with Accept and this new solo avenue, the group and Udo parted ways. The answer for Accept? A young, long haired American image that carried that pretty boy, hair metal look that was selling records for glam superstars like Cinderella, Poison, and Bon Jovi. They found that look and that answer in David Reece.

Reece originally was in a band called Gale Force, and after sending in a few audition tapes, landed the gig of leading a German hard rock sensation like Accept. He had the looks, and with a voice that fit snugly in the powerful styles of Rob Halford and Tony Harnell, he was the chance Accept was looking for. By 1989 the band had wore out their groovy, metallic rock sound, so they changed gears musically to fit Reece's vocal delivery. In 1989 CBS Records proudly unveiled "Eat The Heat", the new and improved Accept, the more commercial and arena rock ready band that could invade North American audiences, and more importantly, wallets and Billboard charts.

With cuts like "Prisoner", "Love Sensation", and "Mistreated", Accept showed off a bit more "pomp" than "push". Their songwriting was geared more towards relationships and life more so than battlefields and angst. The band still had the metallic drive, evident on strong ripper "Helltrain", but for the most part this was more of a commercial venture for the band. Did it work? No, not at all. They toured with W.A.S.P and Metal Church and had very little success. With a new touring guitarist added into the mix, things were not well within the Accept camp. Soon Reece was axed, and Udo rejoined the group for three more albums before their breakup in 1997. Since then Accept has reformed for touring purposes, and David Reece's journey into the band's legacy is long forgotten. But "Eat The Heat" was still a really good record in my opinion, and something to admire and appreciate. Good for them to give it a try, and good for Accept fans to have a slightly different record to pull out off the shelves from time to time.

About this Writer:
Eric Compton // Eric Compton lives in the most haunted city in the world, St. Augustine, Florida with his family and two yorkies. He has served as senior editor for MaximumMetal.com for nearly 10 years and is the author of the heavy metal book series--Denim & Letters. His reviews, interviews and social commentary has been featured on websites like Brave Words, Blabbermouth, Metal Temple, Metal Rules, Ultimate Metal, Metal Maniacs and Wikipedia.

Maximum Metal Rating Legend - Click for Full Details
5 Excellent - Buy it and say a prayer to the metal gods that you were tuned on to this masterpiece. A classic.
4-4.5 Great - Almost perfect records but there's probably a clunker or a lacking somewhere to keep it from perfection. You won't feel bad about dropping some bones on these.
3.5 Good - Most of the record is good, but there may be some filler. This is the OK range where you'd search for the record on sale or used.
3 Average - Some good songs, some bad ones at about a half/half ratio. Could show skills but be dull overall. Redeeming qualities for indy bands are effort and passion. Majors that don't try or suck outright end up here.
2-2.5 Fair - Worth a listen, but best obtained by collectors. There is much better metal out there.
1-1.5 Bad - Major problems with music, lyrics, production, etc.
0 Terrible or an otherwise waste of your life and time.

Note: Reviews are graded from 0-5, anything higher or not showing is from our old style. Scores, however, do not reveal the important features. The written review that accompanies the ratings is the best source of information regarding the music on our site. Reviewing is opinionated, not a qualitative science, so scores are personal to the reviewer and could reflect anything from being technically brilliant to gloriously cheesy fun.

Demos and independent releases get some slack since the bands are often spent broke supporting themselves and trying to improve. Major releases usually have big financial backing, so they may be judged by a heavier hand. All scores can be eventually adjusted up or down by comparison of subsequent releases by the same band. We attempt to keep biases out of reviews and be advocates of the consumer without the undo influence of any band, label, management, promoter, etc.

The best way to determine how much you may like certain music is to listen to it yourself.



ALL FULL REVIEWS FOR: ACCEPT
CD
TITLE BAND
DOR
REVIEWER DATE
Blind RageAccept
2014
Eric Compton9/1/2014
Blind RageAccept
2014
Vinaya Saksena8/22/2014
Blood of the NationsAccept
2010
Eric Compton9/1/2010
Eat The HeatAccept
1989
Eric Compton12/5/2005
The Rise of ChaosAccept
2017
Eric Compton7/29/2017


ALL SUMMARY REVIEWS FOR: ACCEPT
TITLE BAND
DOR
REVIEWER DATE
Blood of the NationsAccept
2010
Vinaya Saksena8/16/2010


ALL INTERVIEWS FOR: ACCEPT
INTERVIEW BAND INTERVIEWER DATE
Peter BaltesAcceptVinaya Saksena12/2/2010


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