Maximum Metal Rating Legend
5 Excellent - Masterpiece. A classic.
4.5-4 Great - Almost perfect records but there's probably a lacking.
3.5 Good - Most of the record is good, but there may be some filler.
3 Average - Some good songs, some bad ones at about a half/half ratio.
2.5-2 Fair - Worth a listen, but best obtained by collectors.
1.5-1 Bad - Major problems with music, lyrics, production, etc.
0 Terrible - Waste of your life and time.

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The best way to determine how much you may like certain music is to listen to it yourself.
Band
Queensryche
Title
Rage For Order
Type
LP/EP
Company
EMI
YOR
1986
Style
Progressive
4/14/2003 - Review by: Frank Hill
Digital loneliness and electronic drama
This early Queensryche album saw the band leaving behind the abstract lyrics and unconventional song lengths of 'The Warning' for more standard song structures with complex arrangements. There seems to be a technology thread running through the romanticism of this progressive metal masterpiece.

I wonder how many tracks they used when recording this disc. The guitars, drums, bass and all are fantastic blending together, but Geoff Tate's vocals is the star of the show here. Tate has an amazing range and he goes from whispers to screams to speaking to everything else in between generally within the same song. Every song is a technical soundscape treat for the apathetic mind seeking creative sustenance. In "The Whisper" an ending guitar note transforms into a vocal wail. It's one of the many gems of sound that sparkle and wink at you amidst the dense tapestry of sound. "Screaming In Digital" may be one of the most incredible, vocally layered, songs I've ever heard.

There are no rock anthems on here. You won't bang your head to it. You won't dance to it and it won't make you break stuff. It may not sound right when your cruising with your top down in the summer sun. It's what you listen to in your dimly lit room on a quiet Autumn night at 1:00 AM when you want to escape from the world and send yourself off on an aural journey. I've heard people say they hate this disc and others that say they love it. The experimentation and dramatics on Rage may have been a little too much for fans given the straight-forward guitar on their next disc, "Operation: mindcrime", but I think that those who like this cd on first listen will find that it grows on them with each subsequent play.

Rage For Order is digital loneliness and electronic drama.
  • 1 :REVIEW COUNT
    5 :AVE RATING

ALL REVIEWS FOR: QUEENSRYCHE
TITLE
DOR
COMPANY
REVIEWER DATE MADE RATING
Condition Hüman
2015
Century Media
Frank Hill11/6/2015
4
EP (remaster)
2003
EMI
Greg Watson8/28/2003
-
Live Evolution DVD
2001
EMI
Frank Hill9/30/2003
-
Queensryche
2013
Century Media
Greg Watson6/29/2013
3.5
Rage For Order
1986
EMI
Frank Hill4/14/2003
5
Rage for Order (remaster)
2003
EMI
Greg Watson8/28/2003
-
The Art of Live
2004
Sanctuary Records
Frank Hill6/25/2004
-

ALL INTERVIEWS FOR: QUEENSRYCHE
INTERVIEW INTERVIEWER DATE TAGLINE


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