Maximum Metal Rating Legend
5 Excellent - Masterpiece. A classic.
4.5-4 Great - Almost perfect records but there's probably a lacking.
3.5 Good - Most of the record is good, but there may be some filler.
3 Average - Some good songs, some bad ones at about a half/half ratio.
2.5-2 Fair - Worth a listen, but best obtained by collectors.
1.5-1 Bad - Major problems with music, lyrics, production, etc.
0 Terrible - Waste of your life and time.

Note: Reviews are graded from 0-5, anything higher or not showing is from our old style. Scores, however, do not reveal the important features. The written review that accompanies the ratings is the best source of information regarding the music on our site. Reviewing is opinionated, not a qualitative science, so scores are personal to the reviewer and could reflect anything from being technically brilliant to gloriously cheesy fun.

Demos and independent releases get some slack since the bands are often spent broke supporting themselves and trying to improve. Major releases usually have big financial backing, so they may be judged by a heavier hand. All scores can be eventually adjusted up or down by comparison of subsequent releases by the same band. We attempt to keep biases out of reviews and be advocates of the consumer without the undo influence of any band, label, management, promoter, etc.

The best way to determine how much you may like certain music is to listen to it yourself.
Band
Fear Factory
Title
Archetype
Type
LP/EP
Company
Liquid 8
YOR
2004
Style
Industrial
4/14/2004 - Review by: MM
Fear Factory - Archetype - Reviewed by: double m

Track Listing
Slave Labor
Cyberwaste
Act Of God
Drones
Archetype
Corporate Cloning
Bite The Hand That Bleeds You
Undercurrent
Default Judgment
Bonescraper
Human Shields
Ascension
School
Of the many metal acts that have come and gone over the last few years, Fear Factory is a rare band that has done both. Many of the same fans that were saddened to hear that the band had broken up over two years ago also rejoiced at the news that Fear Factory was set to return. Along with a spot on the current Jagermeister Music Tour, the California quartet makes that return official with their newest release, Archetype.

For those that may have worried about the quality of the band’s music following the departure of guitarist Dino Cazares, Archetype is a powerful return to form that, while not breaking new ground, revels in its mastery of familiar territory. The band has obviously had to alter their lineup somewhat, but in doing so has still managed to retain a sound both recognizable and more brutal. Fear Factory does not miss a step with former bassist Christian Olde Wolbers stepping into the guitar role and Byron Stroud from Strapping Young Lad handling bass on the road.

On the album itself, Wolbers pulled double duty recording both the bass and guitar parts. Drummer Raymond Herrera brings his trademark, breakneck rhythms and vocalist Burton C Bell is in fine harmonic and heavy form. With Wolbers pulling off two separate parts of the album, Archetype contains a singularity that keeps the band’s signature sound well intact.

Archetype does mark a rare departure for the band in that it is the first since Soul of A New Machine to depart from the theme/storyline of man vs. technology and tackle a variety of subjects. The band’s dealings with the music industry during their downtime is given harsh treatment on both “Slave Labor” and “Corporate Cloning”. “Cyberwaste” is a not-so-subtle message at the band’s online detractors while the title track is a textbook definition of what Fear Factory has become, both musically and lyrically. The more personal subject matter of the songs lends an intangible discordance to the music, giving the album an edge not seen since the band’s breakthrough release, Obsolete. That discordance present does not affect the performance in a negative way at all. Technically, the band sounds as polished as ever – almost like they never left.

For anyone who worried about whether Fear Factory would return with the same vigor and fire they had when the band looked to be over, fear not. Archetype is an authoritative display of a band hellbent on not only surviving, but rising above what they have had to endure and pounding their audience into submission as if they had never left.


--double m04.14.04
  • 1 :REVIEW COUNT
    N/A :AVE RATING

ALL REVIEWS FOR: FEAR FACTORY
TITLE
DOR
COMPANY
REVIEWER DATE MADE RATING
Archetype
2004
Liquid 8
MM4/14/2004
-
Mechanize
2010
Candlelight
Ben McCraw9/30/2010
4
The Industrialist
2012
Candlelight
Greg Watson10/4/2012
3

ALL INTERVIEWS FOR: FEAR FACTORY
INTERVIEW INTERVIEWER DATE TAGLINE
Raymond HerreraMM4/21/2004


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